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Niamah!!! in Chinese

Niamah!!! Chinese version YorMarder!!! http://niamahinchinese.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

I miss you, Malaysia.

I suddenly remembered my primary school friend, Raja Shahrul. He was a pint-sized fellow and was my close friend from Std. 4 to 6. I think. I didn't know he was 'royalty' until other friends pointed out what Raja meant. I always called him Shahrul. I never knew where he lived or what his family did. When you're 10 years old there are more important things in your mind than details. Shahrul used to come to my house in Ipoh often for lunch after school. Somehow, my mother knew to cook pork-free dishes just for him. Shahrul ate. His parents didn't beat him for it. No police reports were lodged. This was back in 1958. We were friends. Things were a little different then.

NIAMAH!!!

Malaysia. A citizen's memory


I just recently heard about and read a bit about the big Hoo-Hah raised by Perkasa over a song recorded by Jaclyn Victor. After that I received a forwarded post on my Facebook. It's a comment and it was written by an old friend, William. I thought you might like to read it too. It's long but worth the time. Enjoy......

The furore over a song recorded by Jaclyn Victor five years ago is a painful r
eminder that religious and racial extremism continues to freely haunt and divide Malaysia under a 55-year-old government.

Immaterial of the song's religious sentiment, Malaysians will always have to contend with people like Perkasa's Syed Hassan Syed Ali, who will insist that Islam must reign supreme with an iron fist in spite of a secular federal constitution.

The divisiveness has not only gone unchecked by BN for decades, it has been fanned and encouraged.

I was born weeks before Merdeka, and the Malaysia of my youth was never secular in practice or its government openly discriminatory to my Catholic faith. My religion and Indian heritage were my cross.

The township of my youth, Sentul, just off Jalan Ipoh in Kuala Lumpur, was a bustling and thriving concoction of Chinese, Malays and people from the wider Indian subcontinent.

Within a square-mile radius were mosques, churches of various denominations, Hindu temples and places of prayer for Buddhists, Sikhs and others.

Add the coffee-shops, stalls, cafes and restaurants that offered banana-leaf fare, laksa, chap fan, mee rebus, mamak mee, char siew pau and nasi lemak, and you had a wonderful township that embraced all ethnic backgrounds, races, religions and cultures, notwithstanding the baggage that came with it.

Most public schools were non-denominational, and boys and girls from myriad backgrounds studied and played together. Chinese New Year, Hari Raya, Deepavali and Christmas would see whole, mixed-race groups of us visit our friends' homes en masse and 'halal' was not yet a force that segregated us.

Underlying it all, sadly, was a system that had already begun to make life difficult for the non-Malay and non-Muslim. Ultimately, my school record suffered, I descended from a straight-A student who consistently made the top five in primary school, to an angry, disillusioned young Malaysian who only managed less than his best in the LCE, MCE and HSC examinations.

Deep and meaningful friendships with Malays were lost and I developed, even nursed, a strong distaste for many things Malay and Muslim, resented every new mosque and call to prayer, and couldn't believe that pork-sellers at the wet market were suddenly relegated to a partitioned corner at the back.

Through the wonderful help of my best friend, a former classmate and Malaysian Baba who also grew up in Sentul as a Catholic, many of those friendships have been rebuilt through very happy reunions that he has organised on my every single trip home.

You cannot buy Malaysians like him, but you can corrupt a whole nation.

I now stand as a Malaysian who has thrown off the yoke that made me, in a sense, racist and bigoted. I no longer blame an entire faith because of some of its followers, and have awakened to the beautiful rainbow of races in Malaysia.

I can only speak from painful personal experiences, which I will recount here in hope and prayer that a new government will forever wipe out the destructive, soul-destroying practices and policies that allowed both institution and individual to make so many of us, impressionable and innocent, to see ourselves as 'us' amid the ever-encroaching presence of 'them'.

Discrimination and division

While this is only one Malaysian's story, the experiences I now share played out in a thriving and beautiful multi-racial community close to the heart of the nation's capital.

And from everything I heard and read about, Sentul was not the exception to the debilitating rule of discrimination and division that has dragged us to the Malaysia of today.

St Joseph's Church, 10am, Sunday morning, early 1970s

What was once a low sidewalk outside the church along Jalan Sentul, which allowed scores of cars to park after whole families were driven to weekly Mass, is rebuilt overnight by the local council, to a height that simply makes parking impossible. Suddenly, we have to park streets away from the church, if not simply take the bus.

Today, whole cities in Malaysia face transport gridlock as Muslims double-park on thoroughfares and main roads for Friday prayers, with the assistance of traffic police no less. We simply live with it, acceptance has descended into the irritable and ultimately insulting notion of tolerance, and we are long resigned to policies overt and covert that make the free practice of religion ever more difficult.

Form 2, La Salle Secondary School

I wake up one morning at home to read in the newspaper that I must achieve a certain minimum score in the Bahasa Melayu paper if I am to hope for a Grade 1 in the LCE. I immediately develop a mental block to learning that language, and in an ultimately self-defeating and warped exercise in resistance to the wider education system, I go on to pay the price in all subsequent exams.

Form 3, La Salle

Students are being registered to sit for the LCE in the school classrooms. One by one, each of us stands as the teacher in charge reads out our names and residential addresses, and asks us to confirm the details.

My turn comes up, and the Malay teacher reads out my full name (including my middle name and the name I have chosen for the Catholic sacrament of Confirmation): "William John Martin de Cruz," he reads out, pauses, and then adds for all to hear: "You don't want to add son of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, ah?"

Today, a single utterance of this nature, made against a Muslim or Islam, is punishable by law, while the BN government has publicly shown how it will dilly and dally as it mulls what to do with people who bring along a decapitated head of a cow to protest against the presence of a Hindu temple in a mainly Muslim neighbourhood.

For the record, this same teacher would go on, in that same year of my Form 3 exam, to distribute 'leaked' questions for the BM paper. I was given the chance to pay for the questions, late at night on the eve of the exam, but chose not to fatten his wallet.

Form 3, La Salle

My brother, his best friend and I form a singing trio that takes part in ‘Bakat TV’, a nationally televised talent competition that has us all riveted to black-and-white screens every Sunday night. Neighbours from my Jalan Kovil Hilir home crowd my living room on our performance nights.

Fanfare magazine, The Malay Mail and various Tanil newspapers give us publicity we never dreamed of; my teachers despair at the 'distraction', and say so in the remarks column of my report cards.

About noon of the Sunday when the finalists are to be announced in a special TV show, a RTM representative telephones us at home, to ask if it is true that our trio will be cut down to a duet - the national broadcaster has come to know that my brother's friend is due to leave for Britain to further his studies, and his departure will come before the date of the finals.

That night on TV, our group is named as a finalist. It is then announced that we have been disqualified - because if you begin as a trio, you must close as a trio. The women in my family cry, my brother and I are devastated, speechless.

Not long after, in the same talent quest, an all-Malay five-piece singing group enters the finals despite the fact that they have been reduced to four, and they go on to win.

1973/74, RTM headquarters, Angkasapuri

My brother and I are invited to perform at a Christmas TV special. We arrive at the briefing early one Saturday. As the performers and RTM backing band mingle, a clerk comes up to us and shows us a sheet of paper, with a list of words and phrases, typed out one after the other to make almost one-and-a-half pages.

It's a Christmas show, but according to that piece of paper (RTM policy on the run), any song we sing cannot have words such as Jesus, Mary, Joseph, God, saints, angels, Bethlehem, Alleluia, Christ, holy....it goes on, ad nauseam.

We nevertheless end up singing a Kris Kristofferson classic, ‘The Pilgrim (Chapter 33)’, which sounds religious but actually glorifies a legend among musicians who drinks, takes drugs and loves like the best and worst of them. We have thrown a stone at the fools on the hill, but a blindly ignorant RTM just doesn't get it.

1975, Registration Department

Despite the fact I was born in a Petaling Jaya hospital, and have the papers to prove it, I have lived with a red identity card (IC), which makes finding permanent work near impossible.

Upon my first application, I am told I am ineligible for that prized blue IC because my family cannot show proof of my late father's place of birth. Any number of people will attest to his being Malaysian, including respected government officials and professionals, but it is not good enough simply because we have no papers to prove it.

But there is a bit of light - I can attend an interview that will re-assess my eligibility. It comes down to one question that I now cannot recall, but I have the correct answer. I am granted a blue IC and get on the road to citizenship.

Ahead of me, in the queue of other 'Malaysians' also wanting that vital, blue IC, is an old, bent Chinese woman, whose chances of getting the correct answer immediately look dismal to me.

I clearly remember the question that is posed to her (it is simply put to her from across a counter for all to hear) - Who is the king of Malaysia? She replies, "Agong". She fails.

I later learn that she should have said, ‘Duli Yang Maha Mulia Seri Paduka Baginda Yang diPertuan Agong’. The poor woman was probably illiterate.

Today, we all hear stories of how citizenship is being doled out, constituency by constituency, to build voter blocs in any number of elections.

This is part of my story as a Malaysian of Indian background and Catholic faith.

This is why I must return to Malaysia to vote, as soon as the 13th general election is called, to help Pakatan Rakyat in any way I can.

And this is why I will be very vigilant of a new and welcome Pakatan government in Putrajaya, as a member of society who will strive to ensure such bigotry, extremism and racism as I have endured may only be relegated to the scrapheap of an ugly history we must all leave behind.

(William is an old friend. He resides with his family in Australia and will be home to vote in the GE13)

Comment from a thamby who loves his country

I just recently heard about and read a bit about the big Hoo-Hah raised by Perkasa over a song recorded by Jaclyn Victor. After that I received a forwarded post on my Facebook. It's a comment and it was written by an old friend, William. I thought you might like to read it too. It's long but worth the time. Enjoy......

The furore over a song recorded by Jaclyn Victor five years ago is a painful r
eminder that religious and racial extremism continues to freely haunt and divide Malaysia under a 55-year-old government.

Immaterial of the song's religious sentiment, Malaysians will always have to contend with people like Perkasa's Syed Hassan Syed Ali, who will insist that Islam must reign supreme with an iron fist in spite of a secular federal constitution.

The divisiveness has not only gone unchecked by BN for decades, it has been fanned and encouraged.

I was born weeks before Merdeka, and the Malaysia of my youth was never secular in practice or its government openly discriminatory to my Catholic faith. My religion and Indian heritage were my cross.

The township of my youth, Sentul, just off Jalan Ipoh in Kuala Lumpur, was a bustling and thriving concoction of Chinese, Malays and people from the wider Indian subcontinent.

Within a square-mile radius were mosques, churches of various denominations, Hindu temples and places of prayer for Buddhists, Sikhs and others.

Add the coffee-shops, stalls, cafes and restaurants that offered banana-leaf fare, laksa, chap fan, mee rebus, mamak mee, char siew pau and nasi lemak, and you had a wonderful township that embraced all ethnic backgrounds, races, religions and cultures, notwithstanding the baggage that came with it.

Most public schools were non-denominational, and boys and girls from myriad backgrounds studied and played together. Chinese New Year, Hari Raya, Deepavali and Christmas would see whole, mixed-race groups of us visit our friends' homes en masse and 'halal' was not yet a force that segregated us.

Underlying it all, sadly, was a system that had already begun to make life difficult for the non-Malay and non-Muslim. Ultimately, my school record suffered, I descended from a straight-A student who consistently made the top five in primary school, to an angry, disillusioned young Malaysian who only managed less than his best in the LCE, MCE and HSC examinations.

Deep and meaningful friendships with Malays were lost and I developed, even nursed, a strong distaste for many things Malay and Muslim, resented every new mosque and call to prayer, and couldn't believe that pork-sellers at the wet market were suddenly relegated to a partitioned corner at the back.

Through the wonderful help of my best friend, a former classmate and Malaysian Baba who also grew up in Sentul as a Catholic, many of those friendships have been rebuilt through very happy reunions that he has organised on my every single trip home.

You cannot buy Malaysians like him, but you can corrupt a whole nation.

I now stand as a Malaysian who has thrown off the yoke that made me, in a sense, racist and bigoted. I no longer blame an entire faith because of some of its followers, and have awakened to the beautiful rainbow of races in Malaysia.

I can only speak from painful personal experiences, which I will recount here in hope and prayer that a new government will forever wipe out the destructive, soul-destroying practices and policies that allowed both institution and individual to make so many of us, impressionable and innocent, to see ourselves as 'us' amid the ever-encroaching presence of 'them'.

Discrimination and division

While this is only one Malaysian's story, the experiences I now share played out in a thriving and beautiful multi-racial community close to the heart of the nation's capital.

And from everything I heard and read about, Sentul was not the exception to the debilitating rule of discrimination and division that has dragged us to the Malaysia of today.

St Joseph's Church, 10am, Sunday morning, early 1970s

What was once a low sidewalk outside the church along Jalan Sentul, which allowed scores of cars to park after whole families were driven to weekly Mass, is rebuilt overnight by the local council, to a height that simply makes parking impossible. Suddenly, we have to park streets away from the church, if not simply take the bus.

Today, whole cities in Malaysia face transport gridlock as Muslims double-park on thoroughfares and main roads for Friday prayers, with the assistance of traffic police no less. We simply live with it, acceptance has descended into the irritable and ultimately insulting notion of tolerance, and we are long resigned to policies overt and covert that make the free practice of religion ever more difficult.

Form 2, La Salle Secondary School

I wake up one morning at home to read in the newspaper that I must achieve a certain minimum score in the Bahasa Melayu paper if I am to hope for a Grade 1 in the LCE. I immediately develop a mental block to learning that language, and in an ultimately self-defeating and warped exercise in resistance to the wider education system, I go on to pay the price in all subsequent exams.

Form 3, La Salle

Students are being registered to sit for the LCE in the school classrooms. One by one, each of us stands as the teacher in charge reads out our names and residential addresses, and asks us to confirm the details.

My turn comes up, and the Malay teacher reads out my full name (including my middle name and the name I have chosen for the Catholic sacrament of Confirmation): "William John Martin de Cruz," he reads out, pauses, and then adds for all to hear: "You don't want to add son of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, ah?"

Today, a single utterance of this nature, made against a Muslim or Islam, is punishable by law, while the BN government has publicly shown how it will dilly and dally as it mulls what to do with people who bring along a decapitated head of a cow to protest against the presence of a Hindu temple in a mainly Muslim neighbourhood.

For the record, this same teacher would go on, in that same year of my Form 3 exam, to distribute 'leaked' questions for the BM paper. I was given the chance to pay for the questions, late at night on the eve of the exam, but chose not to fatten his wallet.

Form 3, La Salle

My brother, his best friend and I form a singing trio that takes part in ‘Bakat TV’, a nationally televised talent competition that has us all riveted to black-and-white screens every Sunday night. Neighbours from my Jalan Kovil Hilir home crowd my living room on our performance nights.

Fanfare magazine, The Malay Mail and various Tanil newspapers give us publicity we never dreamed of; my teachers despair at the 'distraction', and say so in the remarks column of my report cards.

About noon of the Sunday when the finalists are to be announced in a special TV show, a RTM representative telephones us at home, to ask if it is true that our trio will be cut down to a duet - the national broadcaster has come to know that my brother's friend is due to leave for Britain to further his studies, and his departure will come before the date of the finals.

That night on TV, our group is named as a finalist. It is then announced that we have been disqualified - because if you begin as a trio, you must close as a trio. The women in my family cry, my brother and I are devastated, speechless.

Not long after, in the same talent quest, an all-Malay five-piece singing group enters the finals despite the fact that they have been reduced to four, and they go on to win.

1973/74, RTM headquarters, Angkasapuri

My brother and I are invited to perform at a Christmas TV special. We arrive at the briefing early one Saturday. As the performers and RTM backing band mingle, a clerk comes up to us and shows us a sheet of paper, with a list of words and phrases, typed out one after the other to make almost one-and-a-half pages.

It's a Christmas show, but according to that piece of paper (RTM policy on the run), any song we sing cannot have words such as Jesus, Mary, Joseph, God, saints, angels, Bethlehem, Alleluia, Christ, holy....it goes on, ad nauseam.

We nevertheless end up singing a Kris Kristofferson classic, ‘The Pilgrim (Chapter 33)’, which sounds religious but actually glorifies a legend among musicians who drinks, takes drugs and loves like the best and worst of them. We have thrown a stone at the fools on the hill, but a blindly ignorant RTM just doesn't get it.

1975, Registration Department

Despite the fact I was born in a Petaling Jaya hospital, and have the papers to prove it, I have lived with a red identity card (IC), which makes finding permanent work near impossible.

Upon my first application, I am told I am ineligible for that prized blue IC because my family cannot show proof of my late father's place of birth. Any number of people will attest to his being Malaysian, including respected government officials and professionals, but it is not good enough simply because we have no papers to prove it.

But there is a bit of light - I can attend an interview that will re-assess my eligibility. It comes down to one question that I now cannot recall, but I have the correct answer. I am granted a blue IC and get on the road to citizenship.

Ahead of me, in the queue of other 'Malaysians' also wanting that vital, blue IC, is an old, bent Chinese woman, whose chances of getting the correct answer immediately look dismal to me.

I clearly remember the question that is posed to her (it is simply put to her from across a counter for all to hear) - Who is the king of Malaysia? She replies, "Agong". She fails.

I later learn that she should have said, ‘Duli Yang Maha Mulia Seri Paduka Baginda Yang diPertuan Agong’. The poor woman was probably illiterate.

Today, we all hear stories of how citizenship is being doled out, constituency by constituency, to build voter blocs in any number of elections.

This is part of my story as a Malaysian of Indian background and Catholic faith.

This is why I must return to Malaysia to vote, as soon as the 13th general election is called, to help Pakatan Rakyat in any way I can.

And this is why I will be very vigilant of a new and welcome Pakatan government in Putrajaya, as a member of society who will strive to ensure such bigotry, extremism and racism as I have endured may only be relegated to the scrapheap of an ugly history we must all leave behind.

Friday, October 26, 2012

Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Adha

On this blessed Muslim holiday, do something for a deserving child. Read about and participate in Project Heartstrings 2012.


Project Heartstrings is a collective effort by caring Malaysians that will hopefully leave a deeper impact in the lives of t

he children that have to grow up in shelter homes for various reasons.

We would like to collect guitars from the people who are no longer putting them to good use and distribute them accordingly to the shelter homes catering for children around our area.

You can contribute in your own capacity even if it just means passing the word around. We truly believe Malaysians will rise to the occasion to put a smile on these kids. The project spans across October until early December, with multiple events in between such as a video production, collection station at major shopping complex etc.

So how can you help?

Guitar contribution
If you have a guitar that is still in good condition (save some minor damage needing minimal repair), pass it on to us so we can restore it and give it to one of the shelter homes around Klang Valley. You can drop off your used guitars at these The Guitar Store outlet:

1. TGS Cheras: 57-M, 57 Jalan Manis 3, Taman Segar, Cheras 56100, Kuala Lumpur. Tel: 603-9133 2822 (Att Mr Low / Mr Ken)

2. TGS Kepong: 15-1, Jalan Metro Perdana 7, Taman Usahawan Kepong, Kepong Utara 52100, Kuala Lumpur. Tel: 603-6257 6611 (Att Mr Mok)

3. TGS Puchong: E-1-25, IOI Boulevard, Jalan Kenari 5, Bandar Puchong Jaya, Puchong 47100, Selangor. Tel: 603-8075 2822 (Att Mr Chan)

Project Heartstrings Ambassadors
If you are a celebrity and would like to contribute towards the publicity of this campaign, please let us know. We are planning a (sweet tugging your heart string) video (need the link for the passing passing video Albert had in mind) that can be shared on social media sites to create awareness on the project.

Sponsorship
Should you be interested to come on board as a sponsor, there are many ways you can contribute be it monetary or in kind. Areas we currently need help with:
1.Sponsorship of venue for guitar handover event on 15 December 2012
2.Sponsorship of one flight ticket from BKI-KUL-BKI (Kota Kinabalu – Kuala Lumpur – Kota Kinabalu)
3.Sponsorship for Media – Help us spread the word further through the power of media. We seek help from online media, newspapers, radio and TV.
4.For those who do not have guitars to give away, we also are looking for sponsorship to get these kids guitar lessons, about RM100/child/month.
5.Sponsorship for Creative Work – Help us design all the POS materials needed for the success of this project.

Sponsorship for Refurbishment of Guitars - Taken up by The Guitar Store

Should you need any more information, please do not hesitate to post your queries on the group wall, or PM @Roddy Teo for clarification.

Any help is great help! Let's bring some music into the homes of these children :o)





Project Heartstrings Facebook page HERE 

Friday, October 19, 2012

HIyah! No problem. We kao tim nicely for you.

In Malaysia, things always seem a little off-balance.

Here's another one for the record books.


Some time ago the son of the de facto Law Minister, Nazri was charged 


with assaulting a security guard at a condominium in Kuala Lumpur. A 


criminal case. Last Wednesday the Home Minister announced that the 


boy, Nedim had been clear of any wrongdoing as the case had been 


"settled amicably" by both sides.


HUH???!!! 


Criminal case can be "settled" one ah? Phwaaaar!!! Opens up a huge list 


of possibilities man!


Fucking morons!!!


NIAMAH!!!

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Happy Malaysians?



Richest Malaysians

This is going to sound like I am belly-aching but it is really a serious question. Do you notice that the people who claim loudly that they love being in Malaysia and would not live anywhere else usually come from:-

a) the local privileged folks. Meaning those in the RMmillion per annum income group. Or close to it.

b) the privileged expatriates.

Having options is a great way to enjoy what a country has to offer, isn't it?

Would the Malaysian taxi driver, plantation worker, teacher, average office worker feel the same way?

No I am not being sarcy or grumpy. I just would like to hear how you feel. People with options can also answer and help us understand. Thank you.

Niamah!!!

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

LMAO

MILF here...........


MILF everywhere else..........


Both The Sun and The Star today carry stories with the acronym MILF either in the headline or the body of the article.

I never thought that I'd ever see the day that the acronym MILF would be used in our local MSM.  A few short years ago it might have been totally alright I guess. But in today's context MILF is not an acronym I would post up in the headline of a newspaper story. That is unless you purposely want to spread some laughs around la.

Wikipedia describes MILF as and acronym for 
"Mother/Mom I'd Like To Fuck".

But the MILF in the news today stands for 
Moro Islamic Liberation Front.

I wonder if those Moro flers know the more internationally accepted reading of MILF? Maybe they do. And they just have a weird sense of humour.

MILF. OMG! WTF! LMAO!

NIAMAH!!!

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Say sorry. Now!

Rosmah and her Qatari host, Sheikha Moza (photo from The Star)

Ha! All you baargers (that includes me) who doubted that FLOM was on  a valiant mission to Qatar to do the world some great good, you can now please say "SORRY FLOM. We bow before your benevolent wisdom." Why? Read about FLOM's mission...HERE.

Apparently, Qatar "had sought Malaysia's cooperation to realise its desire to provide the most extensive and highest education for children and teenagers, especially those who did not have access to the best possible education."

It's so sad isn't it? People from faraway Qatar appreciate our high quality education systems enough to want to learn from us! And we complain that our education sucks! Or is it that camels, oil and money fuck up your assessment capabilities?

NIAMAH!!!

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

What the....!!!

First off I want to say that I post this without malice to FLOM. Not at all. Seriously. But reading this report from The Malaysian Insider I, as a tax-paying Malaysian, cannot help but feel that her trip and her speech at the event was a waste of Malaysian tax-payers money. Read this and see how you feel...

(from The Malaysian Insider...)


Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor, wife of the Malaysian prime minister, yesterday urged women to take a more active role in their institutions and organisations in order to strengthen business ethics.
She said women could play an important role in strengthening ethics in business because their nature of being mothers and nurturers required that they imbued trust in the relationship they built and developed.
“As mothers, we have a responsibility and opportunity to imbue the right values and inculcate morally sound behaviour in our children. These are values and behaviours which will make them ethical people.
“Further, our roles that include multi-tasking between the home and the workplace demands that we deliver promises to the people who depend and count on us,” she said in a keynote address titled “Role of Women in Strengthening Business Ethics” at the Qatari Businesswomen Association’s programme at the Inside Investor Forum Asia 2012, here.
The two-day forum, organised by the international media group and consultancy Inside Investor, is a high-level business event which brings together heads of state, investors and top-level company executives from the Asean and Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries to identify investment opportunities in the two regions.
Rosmah said women should extend these qualities in ensuring that the companies they worked for delivered on their promises and upheld governance and ethics at all levels of the organisation at all times.
She said the rising participation of women in the global workforce also provided an opportunity for women to play a bigger role in strengthening business ethics.
“There are many reports that predict the 21st Century as the century for women. We see rising involvement of women in boardrooms and executive positions globally.”
“In March last year, Business Insider revealed that women hold 21 per cent of senior management positions globally. This study shows that women are in an advantageous position to strengthen ethics in business,” she said.
Rosmah said that in Malaysia, the government was also encouraging companies to increase the number of women on their governing boards to at least 30 per cent by 2015 and, currently, on-the-job training programmes — most of it focused on strengthening ethics in business — were being held to prepare these women for board positions.
Rosmah said business ethics was important to the company, the consumer as well as the employees and stakeholders, and for the healthy growth of an economy.
“Ultimately, ethics is about doing the right thing; not taking that which isn’t yours; not inflating expenses that you are not entitled to; not manipulating facts and figures with the intention to mislead; not compromising on quality of services and products to maximise profits; and not lying and misrepresenting the truth to look good,” she said.
Those who did not follow ethical rules might have short-term success, but would fail in the market in the long run, she added.
Rosmah said Qatari and Malaysian businesswomen associations could develop a common platform for debates and deliberations on business ethics for insights, learning and sharing experiences.
“We could organise joint programmes regularly that mutually serve both the Gulf and Asean. These could include educational and business programmes as well as exchange of talents that will strengthen business ethics in both regions.”
Meanwhile, in a separate event, Rosmah received the “Honour for Charitable Commitment and Philanthropy” award in appreciation of her dedication and commitment to charity work.
The award was presented by the vice-chairwoman of the Qatari Businesswomen Association Aisha Al-Fardan.  — Bernama

Niamah!!!

Tuesday, October 09, 2012

Be afraid. Be very afraid.

While at the Section 17, PJ wet market this morning I saw this photo of the FLOM in a copy of today's Star newspaper.




Something tells me that the Star's photo editor is going to get a not-so-pleasant call from Putrajaya today. I hope he has emigration plans in place.


Niamah!!!

Monday, October 08, 2012

It's a matter of time



Someone sent me this photo of Rosmah, our FLOM. Okay la, in this day and age with CGI la, PhotoShop la, and don't know what else digital editing wizardry available it is not easy to believe everything we see from the Internet.  


The watch FLOM is shown wearing reportedly costs >RM500,000!!! It is supposedly a Franck Muller Master Square ladies watch. I did a search online and this is the closest I could find to the one on Rosmah wrist.




RM500,000!!! Imagine how long she would have had to save up to buy that. How much do Malaysian prime ministers get paid again?

Niamah!!!

Saturday, October 06, 2012

NADIRAH by Alfian Saat



Alfian Sa'at's award winning play Nadirah is being staged in KL with a cast of fine Malaysians actors and acclaimed Singaporean actress 
Neo Swee Lin reprising her award winning role. Check out our Opening Week promotion ticket price!

THE
 STORY...
Nadirah is the popular and articulate Vice-President of her university’s Muslim Society. She convenes inter-faith meetings where students talk about how they should respect one another’s spaces.

Nadirah is also the product of a mixed marriage. Her father is a Malaysian Malay and her mother a Singaporean Chinese who had converted to Islam. One day, Nadirah’s mother tells her that she’s going to re-marry. To a man who’s not Muslim.

Nadirah’s best friend Maznah, believes that everyone has a right to happiness. Her senior, Farouk, however, is outraged and urges her to do ‘the right thing’.

How does Nadirah make peace between various religions in school when she’s having the same problems at home?

Can mother and daughter worship different gods? Will love or faith prevail?

Nadirah is a bilingual play, performed in Bahasa Melayu & English. Alternate surtitles will be provided during the play.

Funny, insightful and moving, Alfian Sa’at’s award-winning Nadirah wrestles with the complex issue of religion by grounding it in a story about a quirky family and the ties that bind.

PERFORMANCE INFO:

DATE: Nov 1-Nov 11

TiME: 8.30pm (Tue-Sun) / 3pm (Sun)

VENUE: Pentas 2, Kuala Lumpur Performing Arts Centre

TICKETING & PROMO:

Opening Week Promo: Nov 1-4 (Thu-Sun) RM48/RM38 (limited, students only)

Normal ticket price: Nov 6-11 (Tue-Sun) RM58/RM38 (limited, students only)

For ticketing, please call KLPAC Boxoffice @ 03-4047 9000 or visitwww.klpac.org for more info.

Friday, October 05, 2012

Friday funnies

I think there might actually be some guys in Universiti this-or-that, Malaysia working on finding a vaccine for the LGBT 'virus'. Don't you think?


Couple of good ones for the start to the weekend. Funnies, I mean.

The most tragically, ironically funny story is found in The Sun today.

Najib Razak was speaking at the 6th International Association of Anti-Corruption Authorities Conference (IAACA) and General Meeting in Kuala Lumpur. When presenting a RM1million check to the IAACA for their "future endeavours" (God knows what the fuck that means. Someone suggested that it is a "please look the other way" payment) Najib said........................

"This reflects our continuous commitment towards eradicating corruption not only here in Malaysia but also internationally."

Sorry, if that made you chuck your breakfast. Funny kan?

---o0o---

That sick idiot is at it again. Deputy Education Minister, Puad Zarkashi now says that school counselors are to be frontliners to curb the spread of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) phenomenon. The headline in The Sun story is even more hilarious.

"School counselors can be frontliners to PREVENT (my highlight) LGBT"

Curb the spread of the LGBT phenomenon??? Prevent??? It is not an NGO movement that can be controlled by water cannon and tear gas. It is not a school-yard prank that can be curbed by using guideline identification. It is not a disease spread by a virus, you moron!!!

NIAMAH!!!

Wednesday, October 03, 2012

More Wednesday afternoon entertainment......

Malacca Chief Minister, Ali Rustam says that he only spent RM600,000 for the wedding dinner. And not RM1.3 million as claimed by DAP's Lim Kit Siang. He said that he employed 30 chefs who each cooked nasi beriani dishes for 2,000 guests priced at RM10 per serving and with each serving able to feed 3 persons. This would total up to RM600,000 for a wedding feast that could be served to up to 180,000 guests.

(Okay when you're done laughing, there's more.)

When asked if he had sponsors Ali Rustam said yes but they advertised in the souvenir booklet and also donated their products for the event. Like instant noodles and soft drinks.

Okay Ali Rustam, that's all very nice and entertaining to hear but the big question still is this...

How could you, on a CM's salary be able to afford dishing out RM600,000 for a wedding dinner for your son? Did you save from your teenage years for this occasion?

Niamah!!!

It was sponsored ma. Cannot ah?

Takde ape. Diorang bagi I ambik je. Apanama? Ah...Sponsor. Ya tudia.


There! It's out!  

The official reasons.

The Malacca Chief Minister's record-setting wedding banquet for his son and 130,000 guests was paid for by......(insert fanfare here)...Tataaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!......

SPONSORS!!!

Apparently, caterers and "other businesses" sponsored the event. I will bet that you never knew that the Malacca CM, Mohd. Ali Rustam is sooooooooo loved by Malaccans. The CM insisted that the banquet was not a lavish affair and that nobody was forced to attend.  But 130,000 guests is still a mind-boggling number. However, according to the CM's special secretary the reason for the high attendance was very simple.  Okay, I think you better sit down for this...ready?

"This is the first wedding ceremony for the chief minister’s family and every Malaccan wanted to take part. Even estate workers wearing slippers stood in line to shake hands with the bride and bridegroom."

Does that make you want to scream NIAMAH!!! ?

Go ahead. Stick your head out the car window. Open your office door.

SCREAM!!!

Feel better now? Thank you.

NIAMAH!!!

What is corruption?

 Corruption? It's just business.

I have taken the liberty of copying this from my friend, Art's writing. If you ever wondered why corruption is so rampant in Malaysia this story might shed some light on it...

I am grappling with the issue of corruption among Malaysians.

I used to have a relative who was a vendor manager in one of our national car company. Outwardly, he is a pious and God-fearing man. He prays 5 times a day. Would not drink alcohol. He fasts. He doesn't even eat or drink in a Chinese restaurants. (he however eats in Indian restaurants).

The thing is this. He takes money from vendors. Some vendors would bring him to expensive karaoke clubs every week. And he takes cash from them too. If a screw for the car costs 5 sens each, he would mark up to 6 sens and he keeps 1 sen.

One night we were talking. I told him that what he is doing is corruption. He disagreed. He said it is "business". And it is within his "power" to do so. He did not see any harm done by what he was doing. If the vendor doesn't want to do it that way, the vendor can go and fond other business, he says.

I think this mentality is prevalent among Malaysians nowadays. Is this the way our politicians think and is this the reason why corruption is so rampant? They just don't see it as corruption.


NIAMAH!!!

Tuesday, October 02, 2012

A new record from Malacca!!!

The Malacca Chief Minister's son's recent wedding banquet reportedly attracted 130,000 guests. Wow! That is some HUGE wedding dinner. The PR flers now want to know how and by whom the event was financed. At just RM10 per head for F&B it would come to RM1.3 million. Does the Malacca CM earn that much?

Hmmm...now I am waiting to hear what creative reasons will come from the CM's office. What do you think he will say?

My friends paid for it.

The event was covered by the ang-pows my son and daughter-in-law received.

I have been saving all my life for this occasion.
Wait! Actually, cerita started already. In the Malaysian Insider story it was reported that Malacca Umno executive secretary Akbar Ali responded to the Pakatan Rakyat's kacau. He even threw in some racist shit to make things more spicy. He said the PR flers should not assume that the wedding banquet was similiar to a Chinese wedding dinner!!! Phwaar! He said that it was not like the dinner had sharks fins soup. Okay Akbar, let's say you're right. No sharks fins soup. All the guests had were teh tarik and Nyonya kueh . Let's say the cost per head was just RM5. That would still add up to a bill of more than RM500,000! A chief minister would have to work and save a lot of years to have that sort of money to blow on a wedding dinner. No?

NIAMAH!!!

That Effing place

Yesterday I drove past what must be the most explicit public signage I have ever seen in Malaysia. Are the "authorities" really becoming a whole lot more tolerant than we give them credit for? Hahahaha......Okay, the story...

There is a new housing area in Bandar Utama. A totally walled-in, guarded community. Huge 3-storey stand-alone's (I refuse to call them bungalows) that reputedly start at a minimum price of >RM5 million!!! And the name of this housing area?
EFFING HAM
Phwaaar!!! Haram on 2 counts man! Hahahahaha...
Now you can pay RM5 million for the pleasure of telling everyone that you're living in Effing Ham.
"Where do you live?"
"EFFING HAM"
"Effing what???!!!"
"Ham."
  
How could the developers have chosen this name? Or were they purposely fucking with us? Sorry I should have said Effing with us.
Niamah!!!

Nuffnang